Global Resources

Las Mujeres y las Políticas de Internet en América Latina y el Caribe

Author: D. Plou
Publisher:
Publication Date: Nov 2001
As Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use in Latin America and the Caribbean continues to grow, questions persist as to their gendered impacts. The period following the many world conferences of the 1990s saw women and women's organisations come out in force. This has been heralded as 'a third age of feminism', where historically male-biased pursuits such as ICTs have been harnessed and redefined by those working for gender equality and social justice. Although women's organisations have cited cost and time as barriers to ICT use, women's organisations in Latin America and the Caribbean are increasingly using ICTs as a way to keep up to date with information and engage with political and social debates. These include a wide range of mechanisms, from e-discussion lists, electronic newsletters to Spanish-language websites and radio. The report recommends: more research to produce gender-disaggregated statistics on ICT use in the region; combating gender discrimination in employment in the ICT sector; policymakers make universal access a priority and reduce the costs of ICTs; and the participation of women in the decision-making bodies that govern ICT use in the region.
As Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use in Latin America and the Caribbean continues to grow, questions persist as to their gendered impacts. The period following the many world conferences of the 1990s saw women and women's organisations come out in force. This has been heralded as 'a third age of feminism', where historically male-biased pursuits such as ICTs have been harnessed and redefined by those working for gender equality and social justice. Although women's organisations have cited cost and time as barriers to ICT use, women's organisations in Latin America and the Caribbean are increasingly using ICTs as a way to keep up to date with information and engage with political and social debates. These include a wide range of mechanisms, from e-discussion lists, electronic newsletters to Spanish-language websites and radio. The report recommends: more research to produce gender-disaggregated statistics on ICT use in the region; combating gender discrimination in employment in the ICT sector; policymakers make universal access a priority and reduce the costs of ICTs; and the participation of women in the decision-making bodies that govern ICT use in the region.