Global Resources

Gender Impacts of Trade Policies in Latin America: Progress and Challenges for Research and Action

Author: V. Amarante, A. Espino
Publisher:
Publication Date: Jan 2003
What has been the impact of civil society on the formulation and implementation of trade agreements in the Americas? This paper offers an overview of gender and trade research - including on employment, gender segregation in the labour market, salary gaps, and the impact of trade on productive and reproductive spheres. It also looks at the work of women's and feminist organisations, and regional and international networks in analysing and assessing the gendered impacts of trade policies and agreements. The analysis highlights the importance of focusing on the relation between productive and reproductive work and gender discrimination in social, economic and political spheres. It also points to the need for women to participate in decision-making processes and negotiations around trade agreements. The author concludes by identifying areas for further research and guiding questions for a gender sensitive analysis. There is a need for new feminist theories about gender and trade with more research into how trade affects different groups of women.
What has been the impact of civil society on the formulation and implementation of trade agreements in the Americas? This paper offers an overview of gender and trade research - including on employment, gender segregation in the labour market, salary gaps, and the impact of trade on productive and reproductive spheres. It also looks at the work of women's and feminist organisations, and regional and international networks in analysing and assessing the gendered impacts of trade policies and agreements. The analysis highlights the importance of focusing on the relation between productive and reproductive work and gender discrimination in social, economic and political spheres. It also points to the need for women to participate in decision-making processes and negotiations around trade agreements. The author concludes by identifying areas for further research and guiding questions for a gender sensitive analysis. There is a need for new feminist theories about gender and trade with more research into how trade affects different groups of women.