Global Resources

ILO Participatory Gender Audit

Publisher: International Labour Organization
Publication Date: Jan 2007

A Participatory Gender Audit is a tool and a process, based on participatory approaches, which assesses whether internal practices and systems for gender mainstreaming are effective and whether they are being followed. Participatory gender audits are used at an individual, team and organisational level to promote learning on how to integrate gender concerns throughout an institution. The International Labour Organization (ILO) began this process in October 2001 and has since expanded its audits to cover field offices, major constituents, such as the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU), and United Nations agency offices in Zimbabwe and Mozambique. This eight-page brochure gives an overview of the ILO's experience of carrying out participatory gender audits and lists some key findings and outcomes. It underlines how, through the audit process, country-specific plans and strategies for gender equality and mainstreaming have been developed. In Sri Lanka, for example, where gender audits were carried out in 2004 with the Ministry of Labour and Employment, the Employers' Federation of Ceylon (EFC), and two trade union federations, a Gender Bureau was created in the Ministry of Labour and Employment, and gender task forces were set up in all audited units to monitor the implementation of audit recommendations.

A Participatory Gender Audit is a tool and a process, based on participatory approaches, which assesses whether internal practices and systems for gender mainstreaming are effective and whether they are being followed. Participatory gender audits are used at an individual, team and organisational level to promote learning on how to integrate gender concerns throughout an institution. The International Labour Organization (ILO) began this process in October 2001 and has since expanded its audits to cover field offices, major constituents, such as the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU), and United Nations agency offices in Zimbabwe and Mozambique. This eight-page brochure gives an overview of the ILO's experience of carrying out participatory gender audits and lists some key findings and outcomes. It underlines how, through the audit process, country-specific plans and strategies for gender equality and mainstreaming have been developed. In Sri Lanka, for example, where gender audits were carried out in 2004 with the Ministry of Labour and Employment, the Employers' Federation of Ceylon (EFC), and two trade union federations, a Gender Bureau was created in the Ministry of Labour and Employment, and gender task forces were set up in all audited units to monitor the implementation of audit recommendations.